Graduate Program Handbook

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY 

  

GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN HISTORY

HANDBOOK

Masters of Arts Degree -- History

Masters of Arts Degree -- African American Studies with A Concentration in African Diaspora History

Doctor of Philosophy Degree -- History

 

Seventh Edition 2019

  

 

For More Information: 443-885-3400; 443-885-1156

Department of History, Morgan State University, 1700 E. Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore, MD. 21251

HISTORY AND AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES GRADUATE HANDBOOK
                             Interim Chair of Department
                     Dr. Jeremiah Dibua, Professor of History
    BSSC, Room 226F, Phone (443) 885-3190; Fax (443) 885-8227
                            Email-Jeremiah.Dibua@morgan.edu
 
Coordinator of Graduate Programs in History and African American Studies
                     Dr. Brett Berliner, Associate Professor of History
        BSSC, Room 335, Phone (443) 885-1783; Fax (443) 885-8227
                            Email-Brett.Berliner@morgan.edu
                                                          

                                                                  Graduate Faculty
Brett A. Berliner, Ph.D. University of Massachusetts, Associate Professor of History (Modern Europe)
Jeremiah I. Dibua, Ph.D. University of Benin, Professor of History (Historiography, Modern Africa, African Diaspora)
Francis Dube, Ph.D. University of Iowa, Associate Professor of History (Africa, Medicine and Public Health, Environmental History)
Linda Noel, Ph.D. University of Maryland-College Park, Associate Professor of History (Immigration History, 19th-20th Century America)
Lawrence Peskin, Ph.D. University of Maryland-College Park, Professor of History (Early America)
David Taft Terry, Ph.D. Howard University, Associate Professor of History (19th and 20th Century African American, Urban History, Museum Studies and Public History)

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

HISTORY (PH.D.)

Jeremiah Dibua, Ph.D.
Interim Chair, History and Geography
BSSC 226F
Tel.: (443) 885-3190: Fax: (443) 885-8227
E-mail: Jeremiah.Dibua@morgan.edu

Brett Berliner, Ph.D.
Graduate Program Coordinator
BSSC 335
Tel.: (443) 885-1783: Fax: (443) 885-8227
E-mail: Brett.Berliner@morgan.edu

Program Objective
The Ph.D. program in History is designed for students who plan to have careers as research scholars, college and university professors, and/or public historians in archives, museums, government, and community organizations, and/or as curriculum specialists in secondary and elementary education.

Program Description
The History doctoral program focuses on three main fields: African American History, African Diaspora History, and 20th/21st Centuries United States History. Students are also exposed to aspects of public history.

General Requirements
Candidates for the Ph.D. degree in History must maintain an overall grade point average of 3.0 in all course work at the end of each academic semester. Candidates must complete a minimum of thirty-six (36) credit hours, pass the written comprehensive examinations in the major and minor fields, meet or pass the foreign language or research skill requirement, submit an acceptably written dissertation, and successfully complete an oral defense of the dissertation.

Students have the option of retaking a course in which they earned a "C" grade.

Admission
Admission to the doctoral program in History is granted once a year in the fall semester. To be eligible for admission to the PhD Program in History, an applicant must:

• Have a Master's degree with a thesis or the equivalent thereof in History, or a related field, from a regionally accredited college or university.

• Possess a grade point average of at least 3.0 in all previous post-baccalaureate work.

• Submit an application for admission to the School of Graduate Studies. All required documents must be submitted as directed by the School of Graduate Studies prior to program review and admission decision.

• Provide an official copy of GRE scores and official transcripts submitted to the Graduate School. GRE scores may not be more than 5 years old prior to the date of application. These scores must be delivered by ETS to the Morgan State University School of Graduate Studies.

• Students for whom instruction has not been in English must submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

• Use the application system to arrange for three letters of recommendation to be placed with the application. These letters must be from officials or faculty members of institutions previously attended who are acquainted with the applicant's ability for graduate study or from employment supervisors where applicable.

• A writing sample (a graduate seminar or research paper) in History.

• A typed exposition regarding the candidate's personal academic and professional plans and the reasons for selecting Morgan State University. The statement should include the proposed major concentration and two minor concentrations of study.

Additional Requirements
• Students entering the program with GRE verbal scores below 500 in the old GRE or 153 in the new GRE are required to enroll and pass with a grade of "B" or better in HIST 599 Historical Writing (no credit toward the degree).

• Students who have not completed prerequisite credits required for enrollment in the Ph.D. level courses in previous post-baccalaureate study will be required to take up to 6 credits of prerequisite courses at the 500 to 700 levels.

• Students with post-baccalaureate degrees in related fields must have earned a minimum of 9 graduate credit hours in History.

• Students must select one major from the three fields below:

African American History
African Diaspora History
Twentieth/Twenty first Century United States History

The remaining two fields will serve as minor concentrations.

Meeting the minimum eligibility requirements and submitting all the required documents does not guarantee that an offer of admission will be made to the applicant. The decision of the Program Admissions Committee involves a review and analysis of all the elements of the application as well as the availability of positions in the program. The committee then recommends to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies that an offer of admission should be made based on that review.

(See the MSU Graduate School Catalog for "General Degree Requirements.")

Candidacy
Students achieve candidacy by successfully passing the comprehensive examinations in their major and minor fields, successfully completing HIST. 901 and defending the dissertation proposal, and fulfilling the foreign language proficiency requirement.
Once a student achieves candidacy, enrollment in any course other than HIST. 998 or HIST. 997 is generally prohibited. Students seeking additional skills, knowledge, or a certificate must seek approval through the program up to the School of Graduate Studies. The request must be accompanied with a revised Plan of Study.
Dissertation Completion
Ph.D. Dissertation Writing Guidelines
The Dissertation and Thesis Handbook, which contains guidelines for the preparation of the thesis is available on the website of the Graduate School.
A student considering a dissertation topic should do preliminary research to locate other dissertations, books, or scholarly essays related to his/her proposed topic to eliminate conflicts with the topic and to find sources for primary research. Afterwards, the student should confer with the Graduate Coordinator and Dissertation Advisor regarding the appropriateness of the topic. Once a tentative topic is agreed upon, the student must officially register the topic with the Graduate Coordinator.
Forming a Dissertation Committee
The Dissertation Committee consists of the Dissertation Supervisor, two members of the History Graduate Faculty, and an outside reader. The Dissertation Supervisor and the student must agree on the topic selected. If no agreement can be reached, the student must find another Dissertation Supervisor, or change to a topic on which the Supervisor and the student can agree. Dissertation Supervisors and students must commit to work together. The Dissertation Supervisor and the student must both agree to the selection of other members of the committee who in turn should commit to work with the student and supervisor. If the dissertation supervisor and the student believe that the expertise of a non-History graduate faculty within or outside the History Department but a faculty at Morgan State University, is essential for the successful completion of the dissertation, they should request the approval of the Graduate Coordinator to include the faculty on the committee (no more than one non-History graduate faculty can serve on a dissertation committee). The student must officially register the names of the dissertation committee members with the Graduate Coordinator. The Graduate Coordinator, in consultation with the Supervisor, invites the outside reader for the oral defense of the dissertation at the appropriate time to join the committee. The dissertation must be successfully defended in a public oral defense.
HIST 901-Dissertation Proposal (3 credits): Students officially begin researching and writing a dissertation proposal in HIST 901. The goal of this course is to complete searching the secondary literature to find any existing work that may duplicate the proposal; to locate additional repositories with primary sources; and to find models for analysis and conceptual frameworks.
Once topics are confirmed, students begin working with the dissertation faculty. After the committee has been confirmed the student will write a proposal to be approved by both the teacher of record for HIST 901: Dissertation Proposal and the Dissertation Supervisor (these persons may be one and the same). Before the semester ends, the dissertation committee members will receive a copy of the approved proposal. The teacher of record for HIST 901: Dissertation Proposal will then convene a group session, where dissertation students enrolled in the class present their proposals orally before their Dissertation Supervisor and committee members.
Students will receive letter grades for HIST 901: Dissertation Proposal. Those who do not complete the dissertation proposal, or participate in the group session, will receive an "I" or "F" grade for the course. Requirements for HIST 901: Dissertation Proposal must be completed during the semester following receipt of an "I" grade.
HIST 998 - Dissertation Seminar (3 credits): Students do the major researching and writing for the approved dissertation topic in HIST 998. This is a required course and its goal is to complete the research and to continue writing the dissertation.
Enrolled students work primarily with their Dissertation Supervisors. However, students will also report to the teacher of record for HIST 998: Dissertation Seminar, who will assist students individually and meet with all the enrolled students periodically in a group for progress reports. At this point, students should be submitting completed dissertation chapters to be critiqued by the dissertation supervisor and others assigned.
Before the semester ends, the teacher of record for HIST 998: Dissertation Seminar will convene an open meeting for students enrolled, Dissertation Supervisors and committee members, who will receive a copy of the revised, approved proposal. Students will provide a verbal progress report and receive questions from the committee members. This is a rehearsal for the required oral defense.
Students who do not complete the dissertation at the end of HIST 998: Dissertation Seminar must take HIST 997: Dissertation Guidance, which is a three-hour in residency course. Candidates receive grades of CS for HIST 998: Dissertation Seminar until the dissertation is successfully defended, after which the final grade of Pass is recorded by the teacher who taught the candidate HIST 998: Dissertation Seminar. Students are responsible for remembering the name of the professor who was their teacher of record for HIST 998: Dissertation Seminar and when the course was taken in order to facilitate receiving their final grade for the course.
Dissertation Deadlines
Spring - Candidates who plan to complete the thesis for the Spring semester graduation must follow these deadlines:
Submit all first chapter drafts to the Dissertation Advisor early in the Fall semester. The Dissertation committee should have a conference with the student no later than after they have read the first two draft chapters of the dissertation. This meeting will among other things, discuss the viability of the dissertation topic, and the written comments and suggestions of the committee members would be given to the candidate and the advisor after the meeting. The Dissertation Advisor will ensure that the comments and suggestions are addressed by the candidate during the writing of the first draft of the chapters.
Submit revised draft of the entire dissertation to the Dissertation Advisor by November 30th. Once the draft has been approved, the Dissertation Advisor will authorize the student to make two copies for the committee to read.
Submit the revised dissertation including preliminary bibliography to the committee when classes begin in January. At this point, the Dissertation Advisor in consultation with the two other members of the committee will decide on who will be the outside reader and the proposed date for oral defense. Upon the recommendation of the Dissertation Advisor, the Graduate Programs Coordinator will contact the outside reader. The committee should read the revised drafts within three weeks and submit their comments to the student and the Dissertation Advisor. Upon the approval of the Advisor and the committee, the student would prepare a draft of the dissertation for oral defense.
All approved chapters and bibliography should be submitted to committee members and the outside reader at least two weeks before the date for oral defense.
Submit final approved and signed dissertation to the Graduate School office no later than the specified deadline to ensure May graduation. Students must complete the revisions requested by the committee before members will sign the dissertation.
If you miss the deadline you can continue working on the dissertation until the Spring semester ends. If you turn it in to the Graduate School before graduation, you will not have to register again, but you will need to reapply for graduation in December.
Dissertation candidates must adhere to the above deadlines. Candidates must be registered for HIST 997: Dissertation Guidance during the writing process and in the semester the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School. Faculty will not supervise dissertation writing students who are not registered. To guarantee full supervision from the Dissertation Advisor students should complete the dissertation within three semesters of registering for HIST 997 Dissertation Guidance. The grade for HIST 997: Dissertation Guidance is "S". Students must continue registering for HIST 997: Dissertation Guidance every semester after taking HIST 998: Dissertation Seminar until the final approved dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School.
Summer - Candidates who plan to complete the dissertation in the summer must register for the first summer session. Candidates can only finish in the summer if their committee members will be available to read and sign the dissertation during June.
Fall - Candidates who plan to complete the dissertation for fall semester graduation must follow these deadlines:
Submit all first chapter drafts to the Dissertation Advisor early in the Spring semester. The Dissertation committee should have a conference with the student no later than after they have read the first two draft chapters of the dissertation. This meeting will among other things, discuss the viability of the dissertation topic, and the written comments and suggestions of the committee members would be given to the candidate and the advisor after the meeting. The Dissertation Advisor will ensure that the comments and suggestions are addressed by the candidate during the writing of the first draft of the chapters.
Submit revised draft of the entire dissertation to the Dissertation Advisor by April 30th. Once the draft has been approved, the Dissertation Advisor will authorize the student to make two copies for the committee to read.
Submit the revised dissertation including preliminary bibliography to the committee when classes begin in August/September. At this point, the Dissertation Advisor in consultation with the two other members of the committee will decide on who will be the outside reader and the proposed date for oral defense. Upon the recommendation of the Dissertation Advisor, the Graduate Programs Coordinator will contact the outside reader. The committee should read the revised draft within three weeks and submit their comments to the student and the Dissertation Advisor. Upon the approval of the Advisor and the committee, the student would prepare a draft of the dissertation for oral defense.
All approved chapters and bibliography should be submitted to committee members and the outside reader at least two weeks before the date for oral defense.
Submit final approved and signed dissertation to the Graduate School office no later than the specified deadline. . Students must complete the revisions requested by the committee before members will sign the dissertation.
Dissertation candidates must adhere to the above deadlines. Candidates must be registered for HIST 997: Dissertation Guidance during the writing process and in the semester the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School. Faculty will not supervise dissertation writing students who are not registered. To guarantee full supervision from the Dissertation Advisor students should complete the dissertation within three semesters of registering for HIST 997 Dissertation Guidance. The grade for HIST 997: Dissertation Guidance is "S". Students must continue registering for HIST 997: Dissertation Guidance every semester after taking HIST 998: Dissertation Seminar until the final approved dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School.
Additional Requirement
Students should refer to the university and College of Liberal Arts policies regarding academic integrity, expectation of professional ethics and behavior, accommodations for disability, and appeals and due process regarding grades and other relevant issues.

Ph.D. History Course Requirements
Writing Skills Requirement: GRE Verbal Score of at least 500 in the old GRE or 153 in the new GRE, or HIST 599: Historical Writing 3 (non-degree) credit hours.

Pre-requisite History Courses (500-700 level courses) 3-6 (non-degree) credit hours.

HIST 804: Advanced Historiography 3 credit hours

Content and/or Theory Courses (600+ level)
Major Concentration Courses 12 credit hours
Minor Concentration Courses 1: 6 credit hours
Minor Concentration Courses 2: 6 credit hours

Proficiency Competency Requirement in a
Foreign Language at fourth semester (202 level
or above)* 3 (non-degree) credit hours

*Competency in Foreign Language may also be met by a proficiency examination administered by the Department of World Languages and International Studies or by graduation from a foreign four-year college/university where English was not the language of instruction.

Or

HIST 808: Oral History Practicum 3 (non-degree) credit hours
(Prerequisite: HIST 708 Oral History)**

Or

HIST 807: Archival Practicum 3 (non-degree) credit hours
(Prerequisite: HIST 707 Archival Theory)**

**Prerequisite course HIST 708 Oral History may be applied toward the degree as a 3 credit hours US Twentieth/Twenty first Century History course, or as an elective.

**Prerequisite course HIST 707 Archival Theory may be applied toward the degree as a 3 credit hours African American History course or as an elective.

Dissertation Courses
HIST 901: Dissertation Proposal 3 credit hours
HIST 998: Dissertation Seminar 3 credit hours
HIST 997: Dissertation Guidance 3 (non-degree) credit hours

Elective 3 credit hours

Total Degree Credit Hours 36 credit hours

Plan of Study
The typical plan of study requires enrollment in a minimum of nine (9) credit hours per semester to remain full-time. Not every course is offered every semester, and the following plan of study is an illustration. At the initial conference with an advisor, a preliminary plan of study will be established, and this will be reported to the School of Graduate Studies (using the SGS Plan of Study Form) for placement in the student's official file. At this time, any anticipated exceptions or anticipated transfer credits will be noted. An estimated time for completion of the dissertation must be included. Changes to the plan of study will be reported to the School of Graduate Studies. The student and advisor will sign the form submitted to the School of Graduate Studies.
Year 1, First Semester (Fall, Year 1):
Sample Courses, 9 credit hours:
HIST. 804: Advanced Historiography & Historical Methods 3
600-800 level History course in major or minor field 3
600-800 level History course in major or minor field 3
Or
(Where applicable one or two 500-700 level prerequisite history courses) 3-6 (non-degree) credit hours
Year 1, Second Semester (Spring, Year 1):
Sample Courses, 9 credit hours:
600-800 level History course in major or minor field 3
600-800 level History course in major or minor field 3
600-800 level History course in major or minor field 3
Or
(Where applicable HIST. 599: Historical Writing) 3 (non-degree) credit hours
Year 2, Third Semester (Fall, Year 2):
Sample Courses, 9 credit hours:
HIST. 707 or 708: Archival Theory or Oral History 3
600-800 level History course in major or minor field 3
600-800 level History course in major or minor field 3
Year 2, Fourth Semester (Spring, Year 2):
Sample Courses, 9 credit hours
HIST. 807 or 808: Archival Practicum or Oral History Practicum 3 (non-degree) credit hours
HIST. 901: Dissertation Proposal 3
600-800 level History elective course 3
Totals: Years 1 and 2, 33 Degree credit hours completed
Year 3, Fifth Semester, (Fall, Year 3):
History 998: Dissertation Seminar 3 credits (reports as 9 to establish full-time)
Years 1 and 2, and Fall, Year 3, 36 academic credit hours have been completed.
Continuing Semesters (continuing enrollment required to complete the dissertation):
HIST. 997: Dissertation Guidance 3 credits per semester (reports as 9 to establish full-time)
Note: Dissertation Guidance course cannot be used to fulfill academic, curricular credits. The course is used only when the curriculum has been completed, and the student is completing the research and writing of the dissertation. The course registration maintains the student status as a matriculated, full-time student. HIST. 997 must be repeated until the completed dissertation is deposited with the School of Graduate Studies. Other courses cannot be substituted for Dissertation Guidance. The only eligible grade for HIST. 997 is the grade of S.

MASTER OF ARTS -HISTORY (M.A.)

Jeremiah Dibua, Ph.D.
Interim Chair, History and Geography
BSSC 226F
Tel.: (443) 885-3190: Fax: (443) 885-8227
E-mail: Jeremiah.Dibua@morgan.edu


Brett Berliner, Ph.D.
Graduate Program Coordinator
BSSC 335
Tel.: (443) 885-1783: Fax: (443) 885-8227
E-mail: Brett.Berliner@morgan.edu

Program Description
The Master of Arts program in History exposes students to advanced historiography and historical research methods in History. It is a general program in which students are exposed to the history of various parts of the world, with emphasis on United States history, African American history, African Diaspora history, African history, Caribbean history, Latin American history and Middle East history.

Program Objectives
The Master of Arts in History is designed for students who plan to teach in middle schools, high schools, or community colleges; for students who plan careers in public service, public policy and foreign affairs, public history; and for students who contemplate pursuing further scholarly activities. It is a useful adjunct for persons with careers in theology and law; in library science; in journalism and news management; and in government, business and industry, and administration.

General Requirements
Candidates for the M.A. degree in History must complete a minimum of thirty (30) credit hours, twenty-four (24) of which should be in History, pass a written comprehensive examination and submit an acceptably written thesis.

Students have the option of retaking a course in which they earned a "C" grade.

Admission
To be eligible for admission to the Master of Arts Program in History, an applicant must:

• Have earned a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university, preferably in History or related field
• Have a minimum of 24 credit hours of undergraduate history courses.
• Possess an undergraduate cumulative grade point average (G.P.A.) of 3.0 or better to be considered for regular admission. Students who possess a cumulative undergraduate G.P.A. of between 2.5 and 3.0 may be considered for conditional admission. Post-bachelor's undergraduate credits will not be used to enhance G.P.A. requirements for admission to graduate study.
• Submit an application for admission to the School of Graduate Studies. All required documents must be submitted as directed by the School of Graduate Studies prior to program review and admission decision.
• Use the application system to arrange for three letters of recommendation to be placed with the application. These letters must be from officials or faculty members of institutions previously attended who are acquainted with the applicant's ability for graduate study or from employment supervisors where applicable.
• Submit a typed exposition regarding the candidate's personal academic and professional plans and the reasons for selecting Morgan State University.
• Students for whom instruction has not been in English must submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Meeting the minimum eligibility requirements and submitting all the required documents does not guarantee that an offer of admission will be made to the applicant. The decision of the Program Admissions Committee involves a review and analysis of all the elements of the application as well as the availability of positions in the program. The committee then recommends to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies that an offer of admission should be made based on that review.

(See the MSU Graduate School Catalog for "General Degree Requirements.")

Candidacy
Students achieve candidacy by successfully passing the comprehensive examination, completing all credit hours courses, and the thesis seminar course (HIST. 799).

Once a student achieves candidacy, enrollment in any course other than HIST. 799 or HIST. 797 is generally prohibited. Students seeking additional skills, knowledge, or a certificate must seek approval through the program up to the School of Graduate Studies. The request must be accompanied with a revised Plan of Study.
Thesis Completion
MA History Thesis Writing Guidelines
Students enroll for HIST 799 Thesis Seminar when they are ready to begin researching the thesis topic. Students should have passed the comprehensive exam, or can take the comprehensive exam while taking Thesis Seminar. Students receive a CS grade, which remains until their theses topics are completed and approved.
Arrangements for thesis writing are made with the Graduate Coordinator and Thesis Advisor, who discuss the proposed thesis topic with the student. Once the Thesis Advisor and student decide on the thesis committee members and everyone agrees, the student must officially register the thesis topic and the names of the thesis committee members with the Graduate Coordinator. (The committee consists of three MSU graduate faculty members: the Thesis Advisor, who chairs the committee; at least one other graduate history faculty; and a third professor, who can be from the History Department or a senior faculty member from another department chosen with the approval of the Graduate Coordinator.) Once the committee has formally agreed to serve, the candidate works independently with the Thesis Advisor until releasing the approved draft to the committee to read. Students must register for HIST 797 Thesis Guidance (2 hours) each semester while writing the thesis.
The Dissertation and Thesis Handbook, which contains guidelines for the preparation of the thesis is available on the website of the Graduate School.
Thesis Deadlines
Spring - Candidates who plan to complete the thesis for the Spring semester graduation must follow these deadlines:
Submit all first chapters' drafts to the Thesis Advisor early in the Fall semester.
Submit revised draft of the entire thesis to the Thesis Advisor before the Fall semester final exams. Once the draft has been approved, the Thesis Advisor will authorize the student to make two copies for the committee to read.
Submit the thesis to the committee no later than the third week of January.
Submit final approved and signed thesis to the Graduate School office no later than the specified deadline to ensure May graduation. If you miss the deadline you can continue working on the thesis until the Spring semester ends. If you turn it in to the Graduate School before the end of the semester, you will not have to register again, but you will need to reapply for graduation in December.
Summer - Candidates who plan to complete the thesis in the summer must register for the first session. Candidates can only finish in the summer if their committee members will be available to read and sign the thesis during June.
Fall - Candidates who plan to complete the thesis for fall semester graduation must follow these deadlines:
Submit all first chapters' drafts to the Thesis Advisor early in the Spring semester.
Submit revised draft of the entire thesis to the Thesis Advisor by April 30th. Once the draft has been approved, the Thesis Advisor will authorize the student to make two copies for the committee to read.
Submit thesis to the committee when classes begin in August/September.
Submit final approved and signed thesis to the Graduate School office no later than the specified deadline.
Advisors will not accept a thesis from a candidate who does not meet the deadlines. Candidates must be registered for HIST 797: Thesis Guidance during the semester the thesis is submitted to the Graduate School. Faculty will not supervise thesis writing students who are not registered. To guarantee full supervision from the Thesis Advisor, students should complete the thesis within two semesters of registering for HIST 797: Thesis Guidance. Candidates receive grades of CS for HIST 799: Thesis Seminar until the thesis is completed and approved by the committee. The final grade of pass will be recorded by the teacher who taught the candidate HIST 799: Thesis Seminar. Students are responsible for remembering the name of the professor who was their teacher of record for HIST 799: Thesis Seminar and when the course was taken in order to facilitate receiving their final grade for the course.
Additional Requirements
Students should refer to the university and College of Liberal Arts policies regarding academic integrity, expectation of professional ethics and behavior, accommodations for disability, and appeals and due process regarding grades and other relevant issues.
Program Course Requirements
MA History (30 credit hours)

• HIST 598: Historiography & Historical Methods 3 credit hours
• HIST 599: Historical Writing 3 credit hours
• HIST 788/789: Supervised Research or a Seminar course in History 3 credit hours

• HIST 799: Thesis Seminar 3 credit hours (reports as 9)

• The remaining 18 credits may be taken by following the student's approved program of study. Up to 6 hours in electives may be taken in other disciplines with the Graduate Coordinator's approval.
.
Total 30 credit hours

• HIST 797: Thesis Guidance 2 credit hours (reports as 9)

Plan of Study
The typical plan of study requires enrollment in a minimum of nine (9) credit hours per semester to remain full-time. Not every course is offered every semester, and the following plan of study is an illustration. At the initial conference with an advisor, a preliminary plan of study will be established, and this will be reported to the School of Graduate Studies (using the SGS Plan of Study Form) for placement in the student's official file. At this time, any anticipated exceptions or anticipated transfer credits will be noted. An estimated time for completion of the dissertation must be included. Changes to the plan of study will be reported to the School of Graduate Studies. The student and advisor will sign the form submitted to the School of Graduate Studies.
Year 1, First Semester (Fall, Year 1):
Sample Courses, 9 credit hours:
HIST 598: Historiography & Historical Methods 3
500 level History Course 3
500 level History Course 3
Year 1, Second Semester (Spring, Year 1):
Sample Courses, 9 credit hours:
HIST 599: Historical Writing 3
500-700 level History Course 3
500-700 level History Course 3
Year 2, Third Semester (Fall, Year 2):
Sample Courses, 9 credit hours:
500-700 level History Course 3
500-700 level History Course 3
HIST. 799: Thesis Seminar 3 (reports as 9)
Year 2, Fourth Semester (Spring, Year 2):
500-700 level History Course 3
HIST 797: Thesis Guidance 2 (reports as 9)
Year 1 and 2, 30 academic credit hours have been completed
Continuing Semesters (continuing enrollment required to complete the thesis):
HIST. 797: Thesis Guidance 2 credits per semester (reports as 9 to establish full-time)
Note: Thesis Guidance course cannot be used to fulfill academic, curricular credits. The course is used only when the curriculum has been completed, and the student is completing the research and writing of the thesis. The course registration maintains the student status as a matriculated, full-time student. HIST. 797 must be repeated until the completed thesis is deposited with the School of Graduate Studies. Other courses cannot be substituted for Thesis Guidance. The only eligible grade for HIST. 797 is the grade of S.
M.A. Comprehensive Examination Guidelines
Students can take the comprehensive examination for the M.A. in History after successfully completing a minimum of 18 credit hours with at least 15 of the credit hours in History including HIST. 598 and HIST. 599.

*History electives and electives from other departments must be approved by your advisor.

MASTER OR ARTS - AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES (M.A.)

Jeremiah Dibua, Ph.D.
Interim Chair, History and Geography
BSSC 226F
Tel.: (443) 885-3190: Fax: (443) 885-8227
E-mail: Jeremiah.Dibua@morgan.edu

Brett Berliner, Ph.D.
Graduate Program Coordinator
BSSC 335
Tel.: (443) 885-1783: Fax: (443) 885-8227
E-mail: Brett.Berliner@morgan.edu

Program Description
The Master of Arts program in African American Studies concentrates on African American and African Diaspora history, society and culture.

Program Objectives
The Master of Arts Degree in African American Studies is designed for students who plan to have careers in teaching secondary schools or community colleges; for students who plan careers in journalism, museum or information services, non-governmental organizations, business and industry, and/or for students who are contemplating further scholarly activities.

General Requirements
Candidates for the M.A. degree in African American Studies must complete a minimum of thirty (30) credit hours, at least eighteen (18) of which should be in History and twelve (12) can be from relevant courses in other fields, pass a written comprehensive examination and submit an acceptably written thesis.

Students have the option of retaking a course in which they earned a "C" grade.

Admission
To be eligible for admission to the Master of Arts Program in African American Studies, an applicant must:
• Have earned a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university, preferably in History, African American Studies or related fields.
• Have a minimum of a minimum of 18 credit hours of undergraduate history or fields related to African American Studies.
• Possess an undergraduate cumulative grade point average (G.P.A.) of 3.0 or better to be considered for regular admission. Students who possess a cumulative undergraduate G.P.A. of between 2.5 and 3.0 may be considered for conditional admission. Post-bachelor's undergraduate credits will not be used to enhance G.P.A. requirements for admission to graduate study.
• Submit an application for admission to the School of Graduate Studies. All required documents must be submitted as directed by the School of Graduate Studies prior to program review and admission decision.
• Use the application system to arrange for three letters of recommendation to be placed with the application. These letters must be from officials or faculty members of institutions previously attended who are acquainted with the applicant's ability for graduate study or from employment supervisors where applicable.
• Submit a typed exposition regarding the candidate's personal academic and professional plans and the reasons for selecting Morgan State University.
• Students for whom instruction has not been in English must submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Meeting the minimum eligibility requirements and submitting all the required documents does not guarantee that an offer of admission will be made to the applicant. The decision of the Program Admissions Committee involves a review and analysis of all the elements of the application as well as the availability of positions in the program. The committee then recommends to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies that an offer of admission should be made based on that review.

(See the MSU Graduate School Catalog for "General Degree Requirements.")

Candidacy
Students achieve candidacy by successfully passing the comprehensive examination, completing all credit hours courses, and the thesis seminar course (HIST. 799).

Once a student achieves candidacy, enrollment in any course other than HIST. 799 or HIST. 797 is generally prohibited. Students seeking additional skills, knowledge, or a certificate must seek approval through the program up to the School of Graduate Studies. The request must be accompanied with a revised Plan of Study.
Thesis Completion
MA African American Studies Thesis Writing Guidelines
Students enroll for HIST 799 Thesis Seminar when they are ready to begin researching the thesis topic. Students should have passed the comprehensive exam, or can take the comprehensive exam while taking Thesis Seminar. Students receive a CS grade, which remains until their theses topics are completed and approved.
Arrangements for thesis writing are made with the Graduate Coordinator and Thesis Advisor, who discuss the proposed thesis topic with the student. Once the Thesis Advisor and student decide on the thesis committee members and everyone agrees, the student must officially register the thesis topic and the names of the thesis committee members with the Graduate Coordinator. (The committee consists of three MSU graduate faculty members: the Thesis Advisor, who chairs the committee; at least one other graduate history faculty; and a third professor, who can be from the History Department or a senior faculty member from another department chosen with the approval of the Graduate Coordinator.) Once the committee has formally agreed to serve, the candidate works independently with the Thesis Advisor until releasing the approved draft to the committee to read. Students must register for HIST 797 Thesis Guidance (2 hours) each semester while writing the thesis.
The Dissertation and Thesis Handbook, which contains guidelines for the preparation of the thesis is available on the website of the Graduate School.
Thesis Deadlines
Spring - Candidates who plan to complete the thesis for the Spring semester graduation must follow these deadlines:
Submit all first chapters' drafts to the Thesis Advisor early in the Fall semester.
Submit revised draft of the entire thesis to the Thesis Advisor before the Fall semester final exams. Once the draft has been approved, the Thesis Advisor will authorize the student to make two copies for the committee to read.
Submit the thesis to the committee no later than the third week of January.
Submit final approved and signed thesis to the Graduate School office no later than the specified deadline to ensure May graduation. If you miss the deadline you can continue working on the thesis until the Spring semester ends. If you turn it in to the Graduate School before the end of the semester, you will not have to register again, but you will need to reapply for graduation in December.
Summer - Candidates who plan to complete the thesis in the summer must register for the first session. Candidates can only finish in the summer if their committee members will be available to read and sign the thesis during June.
Fall - Candidates who plan to complete the thesis for fall semester graduation must follow these deadlines:
Submit all first chapters' drafts to the Thesis Advisor early in the Spring semester.
Submit revised draft of the entire thesis to the Thesis Advisor by April 30th. Once the draft has been approved, the Thesis Advisor will authorize the student to make two copies for the committee to read.
Submit thesis to the committee when classes begin in August/September.
Submit final approved and signed thesis to the Graduate School office no later than the specified deadline.
Advisors will not accept a thesis from a candidate who does not meet the deadlines. Candidates must be registered for HIST 797: Thesis Guidance during the semester the thesis is submitted to the Graduate School. Faculty will not supervise thesis writing students who are not registered. To guarantee full supervision from the Thesis Advisor, students should complete the thesis within two semesters of registering for HIST 797: Thesis Guidance. Candidates receive grades of CS for HIST 799: Thesis Seminar until the thesis is completed and approved by the committee. The final grade of pass will be recorded by the teacher who taught the candidate HIST 799: Thesis Seminar. Students are responsible for remembering the name of the professor who was their teacher of record for HIST 799: Thesis Seminar and when the course was taken in order to facilitate receiving their final grade for the course.
Additional Requirements
Students should refer to the university and College of Liberal Arts policies regarding academic integrity, expectation of professional ethics and behavior, accommodations for disability, and appeals and due process regarding grades and other relevant issues.
Program Course Requirements
MA African American Studies (30 credit hours)
• HIST 598: Historiography and Historical Methods 3 credit hours
• HIST. 599: Historical Writing 3 credit hours
• Four courses in African American, African, or African Diaspora or related topics offered at MSU* 12 credit hours
• History electives* 6 hours
• HIST 788/789 Supervised Research or History Seminar Course 3 hours

• HIST 799: Thesis Seminar 3 credit hours (reports as 9)

Total 30 credit hours

*History electives and electives from other departments must be approved by the Graduate Coordinator.

HIST 797: Thesis Guidance 2 credit hours (reports as 9)

Plan of Study
The typical plan of study requires enrollment in a minimum of nine (9) credit hours per semester to remain full-time. Not every course is offered every semester, and the following plan of study is an illustration. At the initial conference with an advisor, a preliminary plan of study will be established, and this will be reported to the School of Graduate Studies (using the SGS Plan of Study Form) for placement in the student's official file. At this time, any anticipated exceptions or anticipated transfer credits will be noted. An estimated time for completion of the dissertation must be included. Changes to the plan of study will be reported to the School of Graduate Studies. The student and advisor will sign the form submitted to the School of Graduate Studies.
Year 1, First Semester (Fall, Year 1)
Sample Courses, 9 credit hours:
HIST 598: Historiography & Historical Methods 3
500 level History Course 3
500 level History Course 3
Year 1, Second Semester (Spring, Year 1):
Sample Courses, 9 credit hours:
HIST 599: Historical Writing 3
500-700 level History or elective Course 3
500-700 level History or elective Course 3
Year 2, Third Semester (Fall, Year 2):
Sample Courses, 9 credit hours:
500-700 level History or elective Course 3
500-700 level History or elective Course 3
HIST. 799: Thesis Seminar 3 (reports as 9)
Year 2, Fourth Semester (Spring, Year 2):
500-700 level History or elective Course 3
HIST 797: Thesis Guidance 2 (reports as 9)
Year 1 and 2, 30 academic credit hours have been completed
Continuing Semesters (continuing enrollment required to complete the thesis):
HIST. 797: Thesis Guidance 2 credits per semester (reports as 9 to establish full-time)
Note: Thesis Guidance course cannot be used to fulfill academic, curricular credits. The course is used only when the curriculum has been completed, and the student is completing the research and writing of the thesis. The course registration maintains the student status as a matriculated, full-time student. HIST. 797 must be repeated until the completed thesis is deposited with the School of Graduate Studies. Other courses cannot be substituted for Thesis Guidance. The only eligible grade for HIST. 797 is the grade of S.
M.A. Comprehensive Examination Guidelines
Students can take the comprehensive examination for the M.A. in African American Studies after successfully completing a minimum of 18 credit hours with at least 15 of the credit hours in History including HIST. 598 and HIST. 599. Students should inform the Graduate Coordinator at the beginning of the semester in which they plan to take the examination, so that the Graduate Coordinator can contact them about the examination dates and the nature of the questions on the examination. Students must also register to take the examination with the Graduate School.

*Suggested Elective Courses from other Departments:
ENGL 515: African-American Poetic Forms
ENGL 571: Introduction to Multicultural Literature
ENGL 572: The Multicultural Novel
ENGL 583: Colloquium: Literature of the African Diaspora
ENGL 593: Multicultural Literature for Adolescents
ENGL 596: African American Literature
ENGL 597: The Minority Presence in American Literature
ENGL 725: Twentieth Century African-American Women Writers
ENGL 729: Major African American Novelists
ENGL 730: Major African American Poets
ENGL 745: African Literature
GEOG 505: Cultural Geography
GEOG 561: Geography of Africa
INST 510: Sub-Saharan Africa
INST 512: The Caribbean-Latin America
SOCI 530: Black Americans in Sociological Thought
SOCI 531: Sociology of Oppression
SOCI 543: Race, Education, and Social Inequality
SOCI 553: The Black Family in America
SOCI 564: Race and Ethnic Relations
MUSC 524: The History of Black Music


COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY
Course Description
GEOG 503: The Geography of Maryland
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

A geographical analysis of the spatial associations which exist among the historical, cultural and physical patterns of Maryland.

GEOG 505: Cultural Geography
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

An examination of the role of cultures in changing the face of the earth.

GEOG 510: Introduction to Cartography
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

A practical overview of the principal components of modern cartographic techniques.

GEOG 511: Intermediate Cartography
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Pre Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

An intensive examination of cartographic field techniques.

GEOG 561: Geography of Africa
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

A geographic analysis of the physical, cultural, historical and economic patterns of Africa, with special emphasis on Sub-Saharan Africa.

HIST 501: Revolutionary America and the Constitution, 1750-1800
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Emphasis will be placed on the origins of the War of Independence, the revolutionary outcomes of the war, the struggle to establish a satisfactory national government, the Constitution, and the establishment of political parties.

HIST 504: Civil War and Reconstruction
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course emphasizes the role of African Americans in the war and in post-war events; also, causes of the conflict between the North and South from the Compromise of 1850 through the success of the redemptionists at the end of the 19th century.

HIST 505: Turn of the Century America: The Age of Industrialization and Urbanization
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This is an intense study of selected topics from the period of America's "coming of age". These topics will include industrialization, immigration, urbanization, politics, education, popular culture, and social change.

HIST 510: History of Maryland
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This is a survey of the history of the Chesapeake Bay region with emphasis on Maryland. The region's unique qualities of society, economy, and politics as well as race and ethnicity will be explored placing these issues in a national and international context.

HIST 515: Antebellum Free Blacks, 1800-1860
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course describes and analyzes the status of free Blacks and their response to conditions in the United States. Southern African Americans as well as African Americans north of the south will be discussed.

HIST 516: African Americans to 1900
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

The role of African Americans in the development of United States history will be covered from the colonial period to 1900. Emphasis will be upon the relationship of African Americans to the African Diaspora and the place of women in African American culture and society.

HIST 517: African Americans in the Twentieth Century
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

The role of African Americans in the development of United States history will be covered from 1900 to 2000. Emphasis will be upon African American responses to civil rights, the African Diaspora, the place of women, and the Black culture in their communities.

HIST 518: History of Baltimore
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course covers the history of Baltimore from its founding in 1729 to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on Baltimore's African American community and the availability of local research sources.

HIST 519: The Ethnic Experience in America
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

An investigation of the experience of Blacks, American Indians, and various immigrant groups in a historical context will be covered. Similarities and differences in the experiences of the groups, their interaction and their impact will be studied.

HIST 520: A History of American Urbanization
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will be a study of American urban history. Beginning with the colonial town, the course will trace the growth of the city to the present. Urban migration, way of life, industrialization, minority groups, and the growth of urban social institutions will be emphasized.

HIST 523: Women in American History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

An examination of the role of women from many classes and groups(Black, immigrant, working class, etc.) in the nation's development will be the focus of the class. Attention will be given to major historiographic trends and controversies.

HIST 525: Legacy of the Great Depression and the New Deal
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course examines the Great Depression and the response of the Franklin Roosevelt administration. It assesses the consequences of public policy about social services, employment and economy regulation and the evolution of organized labor.

HIST 526: The United States at War in the Twentieth Century
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will be a comparative study of World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the War in Vietnam with emphasis on the changes they brought in U.S. society on the economy, women and minorities, civil liberties tradition, attitudes and values.

HIST 529: The Environmental Crisis in Historical Perspective
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will consider environmental problems in light of both their historical development and current implications. Social and economic effects of environmental decline will be treated, as will proposed solutions. Special emphasis will be placed on minority communities and Third World environmental problems.

HIST 530: Colloquium: African American History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will explore special topics in African American history.

HIST 531: Colloquium: African Diaspora History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Changing topics in comparative African Diaspora history will be studied in relationship to the United States, the Caribbean and Africa.

HIST 560: Colloquium in African History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semester
s
This course will examine special topics in African history.
 
HIST 561: Pre-Colonial Sub-Sahara Africa
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Problems in the history of Sub-Sahara Africa before the partition by the Europeans will be examined both in detail and critical analysis.

HIST 562: Colonial and Contemporary Sub-Sahara Africa
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

The history of Sub-Sahara Africa since the partition will be examined. Topics will include the nature of imperial rule, the development of African nationalism, and various problems of the emerging African independent states.

HIST 570: Colloquium: American History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will examine special topics in American history.
 
HIST 571: Colloquium: State and Local History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Special topics in state and local history will be researched and discussed.

HIST 572: Latin American History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Beginning with Pre-Columbia times, the course will survey social, economic and political developments in Central and South America from colonial times to the present, with focus upon ethnic and racial diversity as well as U. S. relations.

HIST 575: A History of the Caribbean
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

The course will survey the historical, social, political, and cultural processes and the structures that exist among the major Caribbean states with focus on race, ethnicity and U.S. relations.

HIST 580: Historical Origins of Contemporary Problems
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Students will examine selected "hot spot" around the world. This course will emphasize both understanding of the current situation and analysis of its historical origins. Topics will vary according to world events and student interest.

HIST 598: Historiography and Historical Methods
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall Semester

In this course, students develop proficiency in the basics of research, examine the issues and controversies of history as an enduring discipline, and become familiar with a representative sampling of established historians and their work. A major emphasis will be on library usage and research techniques. This course, or its equivalent, is the prerequisite for HIST 804, and all courses above the 500 level.

HIST 599: Historical Writing
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Spring Semester

This course teaches graduate students in the Department of History and Geography the historical method through research and written exercises.

HIST 605: The United States Constitution and Public Policy
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will stress the application of constitutional law upon selected public policies and political actions throughout the history of the United States.

HIST 610: Colloquium on U.S. Public Policy
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will include reading, critical analysis, research and discussion of special topics in U.S. public policy.

HIST 613: History of South Africa
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

The course will focus upon the struggle between indigenous groups such as the Zulus and Europeans who have attempted to control the region since the 19th century.

HIST 615: History of Traditional West Africa
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Selected ethnic groups from this region of Sub-Sahara Africa will be studied in terms of culture, economy, and politics in the pre-colonial period.

HIST 618: Recent Trends and Issues in Historiography
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Students will examine the contemporary discussion and debates among the leading historians regarding recent historical investigation and analysis. Topics will vary.

HIST 626: Colloquium in Caribbean History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will cover specific topics in Caribbean history that have made a major impact upon the region.

HIST 680: Advanced History Colloquium
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Special topics of current interest in the historical profession will be discussed and researched in depth. Topics will change and/or rotate.

HIST 702: Seminar in African History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

A major research paper is required on a specific theme in African History with discussion and analysis of the theme.

HIST 705: Seminar in African American History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

A major research paper is required on a specific theme in African American History with discussion and analysis of the theme.

HIST 707: Principles of Archival Theory
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will provide a review of archival literature that outlines and defines the basic theories of archival administration and records management. It will also develop concepts for the practical demonstration of archival principles.

HIST 708: Oral History Approach to the Study of 20th Century United States History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This is an introduction to methods and techniques of oral history. Supervised oral history research projects on selected topics are included.

HIST 7I0-711: Directed Readings
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Each course Recent scholarship in selected historical themes will be explored and discussed will be explored. (Repeatable)

HIST 713: Seminar in African Diaspora History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

A major research paper is required on a specific theme in African Diaspora History with discussion and analysis of the theme.

HIST 715: Seminar in Twentieth Century United States History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

A major research paper is required on a specific theme in Twentieth Century U.S. History with discussion and analysis of the theme.

HIST 717: Seminar in Urban History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

A major research paper is required on a specific theme in U.S. Urban History with discussion and analysis of the theme.

HIST 722: Seminar in Public Policy
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

A major research paper is required on a specific theme in U.S. Urban History with discussion and analysis of the theme.

HIST 726: Seminar in Caribbean History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

A major research paper is required on a specific theme in Caribbean History with discussion and analysis of the theme.

HIST 727: Readings in Caribbean History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will examine the works and views of the major writers and historians about the multicultural experiences of the Caribbean. Specific topics will be examined.

HIST 729: Readings in African History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course is an extensive examination of the works, views, and perspectives of major historians on the multicultural experience of Africa. Specific topics will be examined at each offering.

HIST 788-789: Supervised Research:
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

These courses are designed to enable students to participate in research in selected topic areas. Students are required to submit research findings orally in class and to submit a final paper (repeatable)

HIST 797: Thesis Guidance
Two Hours: 2 Credits
Prerequisites: HIST. 799
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Thesis guidance provides students who have not completed their thesis in the assigned semester a mechanism for continuing their work under faculty supervision. Thesis Guidance courses earn ‘S" grades.

HIST 799: Thesis Seminar
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Thesis seminar provides group and one-on-one study, plus introduction to and coordination of the thesis research process. The adviser will provide the student with the framework for researching and writing on a topic of mutual agreement. The grade is "CS" until the thesis is completed and approved.

HIST 801: Advanced Readings in African American History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Through this course the doctoral student will become firmly grounded in the literature of African American history including classics" and publications on the cutting-edge of contemporary scholarship.

HIST 802: Advanced Readings in African Diaspora History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Through this course, the doctoral student will become firmly grounded in the literature of the African Diaspora history including classics" and publications on the cutting-edge of contemporary scholarship.

HIST 803: Advanced Readings in Twentieth Century United States History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Through this course, the doctoral student will become grounded in the literature-of the history of the United States in the Twentieth Century including "classics" and publications on the cuffing-edge of contemporary scholarship.

HIST 804: Advanced Historiography
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall Semester

This course equips the doctoral student with detailed knowledge and research skills necessary for developing historical interpretations and paradigms to complete the dissertation with understanding of cutting edge historiography. The prerequisite for this course is HIST 598 or its equivalent.

HIST 807: Practicum in Archival Methods
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: HIST. 707
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will concentrate on methods, skills, and the practical application of historical knowledge to archival work. It includes one or more field experiences.

HIST 808: Practicum in Oral History
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: HIST. 708
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course will concentrate on methods, skills, and the practical application of oral history to historical research. It includes one or more field experiences in collecting oral evidence.

HIST 880-881: Independent Study
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

Each course provides in-depth research on a topic requiring a one-on-one relationship between doctoral student and professor.

HIST 901: Dissertation Proposal
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course is an introduction to research, organization, writing, and revising of the doctoral dissertation proposal.

HIST 997: Dissertation Guidance
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: HIST. 901 and HIST. 998
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This is the in-residency course which follows HIST 998, providing group and individual guidance. Dissertation Guidance courses earn "S" grades.

HIST 998: Dissertation Seminar
Three Hours: 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Term(s): Fall and Spring Semesters

This course provides group and one-on-one guidance between the student and dissertation advisor, who will provide the framework for researching and writing on the topic approved by the dissertation committee. The grade is "CS" until the dissertation is completed and approved. Students are required to take 998.