Mission

MISSION 

"To prepare beginning generalist social work professionals to become leaders in the urban community"  

The BSW Program's Mission supports the purpose of the social work profession which is to promote human and community well being. The program prepares students to practice in the urban community in a wide range of settings with diverse populations addressing issues such as poverty, social and economic injustices, and combating those conditions that limit human rights. Students develop a skill set that enhances critical thinking, respects human diversity and practices from both a person-in-environment construct and from a global perspective. Consistent with the urban context and focus of the School of Social Work and the University, the mission of the BSW Program is to prepare generalist social work practitioners to practice ethically, competently and effectively with urban individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. The BSW Program provides a learning environment and curriculum in which students are prepared for beginning generalist social work practice through education, research, and service and provides countless opportunities for students to develop skills to practice and become leaders in the urban community. The program is committed to producing leaders who are devoted to the alleviation of human suffering and the improvement of the quality of life for urban residents by addressing societal issues especially those particular to urban communities. This addresses all of the social work values: service, social justice, dignity and the worth of the person, the importance of human relationships, integrity, competence, human rights, and scientific inquiry.


GOALS

1.      To prepare beginning generalist practitioners committed to working competently and effectively with urban individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities;  

2.      To socialize students to the values and ethics of the profession of social work;

3.      To address challenges, issues and problems of the urban environment toward the alleviation of human suffering and enhancing the quality of life of oppressed, at-risk, and vulnerable populations;  

4.      To develop an appreciation for the historical and contemporary contributions of African Americans to the field of social welfare as the context for urban social work practice;  

5.      To prepare students with the knowledge, skills and commitment to address oppression and social injustice in all forms;  

6.      To promote the fullest understanding of the reality and complexity of human diversity as a basis for culturally competent social work practice.


OBJECTIVES

The major objectives of the Social Work Program are to prepare students to function as generalist social work practitioners, to begin a career in social welfare services, to enter a graduate school of social work at an advanced level or to enter other graduate schools with a social science major.

The undergraduate Social Work Program focuses on social work philosophy, knowledge base and practicum field instruction experience. The Program offers an opportunity for students to major in a generalist practice-oriented sequence that is directly related to the delivery of social services in an urban milieu. Morgan's Social Work Program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.


BSW REQUIREMENTS:

An interdisciplinary arrangement of courses that total sixty (60) hours are required for the Social Work major as follows: SOWK 200, SOWK 209, SOWK 329, SOWK 331-332, SOWK 334, SOWK 342, SOWK423, SOWK 424, SOWK 432-433, SOWK 434-435, SOWK 436, SOWK 460.

Social Work Supportive Courses: PSYC 101; SOCI 101, SOCI 351; and ECON 211

SOCIAL WORK COURSE OFFERINGS

SOWK 200 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK
Three hours; 3 credits. This introductory course is open to students interested in pursuing social work as a career and is required for social work majors. The course explores professional social work in terms of its purpose and goals; its values and ethics; its special mission to the enhancement of human well-being and to the alleviation of poverty and oppression; its fields of practice, i.e., child welfare, mental health and developmental disabilities, health care, criminal justice, the work place, human diversity, aging, housing, and the homeless, etc.; and its direct practice methods within a generalist perspective. Special attention will be paid to the historical and contemporary contributions of African- Americans to the broad field of social welfare. The Social Work Admission process will be initiated in this course.

SOWK 209 BLACK FAMILIES
Three hours; 3 credits. One semester. This course is an examination of the strengths, problems, struggles, strategies and adaptations of black families in contemporary society. It includes the role and organization of family members in the urban complex, including kinship clusters, processes of migration and crises adjustment.

SOWK 329 SOCIAL WELFARE AS A SOCIAL POLICY
Three hours; 3 credits. One semester. This course is an examination of social welfare as a broad field consisting of a variety of programs, policies, laws, institutions and systems. Social welfare will be examined from an historical perspective that will provide the student with an understanding of the relationship between societal values, and political and economic influences.

SOWK 331-332 HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I AND II
Six hours; 6 credits. This two course sequence is a study of physical and social environments, including communities and organizations as the context for life course development. Using the Ecological Systems Perspective as a framework, the Course focuses on the complex and dynamic interaction between various environmental systems and the biological, cognitive, and psychosocial development of the individual. Special emphasis will be placed on factors that are obstacles to healthy bio-psychosocial development and functioning, i.e., poverty and socioeconomic disadvantage, interpersonal and community violence, chemical abuse, oppression, etc. Special attention will also be given toward helping students develop their capacity for critical analysis of development theories and the appropriateness of their use as frameworks for understanding and assessing human behavior and functioning of people of color, gay and lesbians and other diverse populations.

SOWK 342 DIVERSITY AND ISSUES OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE

Three hours; 3 credits. The diversity and issues of social and economic justice course explores the dynamics of understanding and appreciation of the unique historical and cultural development of diverse groups in American society. The course presents student framework for cross-cultural comparison as we; as explore the internal divergence or diversity within each group. The course will present a historical analysis of the organizational structures, political ideologies, and leadership styles used by oppressed groups in the struggle for self-determination and empowerment.

SOWK 334 GENERALIST SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE
Three hours; 3 credits. This course will introduce students to the complex and unique characteristics of the profession of social work. Students will explore in depth the knowledge base, values and ethics, and practice methodology that make up generalist social work practice. The course will present social work theories and practice models generic to the profession, the problem-solving model, social work roles, and beginning skills in relationship building and interviewing. The goal of the course is to prepare students for entry into Field Education with a firm grasp of the role and function of generalist social work practice.

SOWK 423 CLINICAL SOCIAL WORK
Three hours; 3 credits. Clinical Social Work/ Case Management links working with the individual in a therapeutic relationship to manipulating the environment on behalf of the individual. The course presents theoretical perspectives of clinical social work and demonstrates the application of clinical techniques to emotional and psychological problems of individuals. It highlights case management as a technique for resource mobilization and matching client need to appropriate services.

SOWK 424 SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY
Three hours; 3 credits. This course prepares Students for the variety of prevention, early intervention, treatment and rehabilitation roles, which the generalist practitioner addresses in ameliorating and reducing problems associated with alcohol and other drug use or abuse. Special emphasis will be given throughout the course to social work values and ethics and issues of cultural competency and diversity.

SOWK 432-433 FIELD INSTRUCTION I & II
Thirty-two hours; 8 credits. Two semesters. This course is designed to place students in a social welfare setting where they have the opportunity under trained, experienced supervisors to practice social work methods, techniques, and skills, and to integrate the theoretical knowledge they have gained in the classroom sequence.

SOWK 434-435 SOCIAL WORK METHODS I & II
Six hours; 6 credits. Two semesters. This course focuses on the basic knowledge, values and skills of a systems process which forms the basis for the social work generalist. Integration with the practical experience obtained in SOWK 432-433 is emphasized. Open only to junior and senior majors.

SOWK 436 SENIOR SEMINAR
One hour; 1 credit. This course is to be taken concurrently with SOWK 433. The course is designed to provide students with a forum to discuss and analyze cases that have been assigned by field instructor supervisors. It also introduces students to professional forms of behavior.

SOWK 460 SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH
Three hours; 3 credits. One semester. This course provides students with the knowledge necessary to understand the different phases of research in the human services. Students will apply theory and research methods of social science to practical social service situations.

SOCIAL WORK ELECTIVE COURSES

MHTC 103 INTRODUCTION TO GROUP DYNAMICS
Three hours; 3 credits. Introduction to theory and practice of group functioning and interaction among and between group members are discussed. Interpersonal relationships among group members as they develop through the processes of discussion and communication patterns, both verbal and non-verbal, will be reviewed and studied. The emergence of leadership and followship will be examined as they happen; the simulation of role playing, psychodrama and other learning techniques will be examined by the students. The class, as a group, will study itself in different group situations to begin the development of sensitivity skills and to understand the various ways through which people communicate their feelings and attitudes in different group settings. Stages of group development and roles in the group will be explored.

MHTC 308 GROUP DYNAMICS: SMALL/LARGE GROUP PROCESS
Three hours; 3 credits. The focus of the course will be on the dynamics of the small group as an instrument for change. Factors which facilitate change and growth in the context of the group and the facilitator as instrument and object of group dynamics will be examined in simulated exercises. The facilitator techniques in each stage of the group's development will be examined. Additionally, the individual will be viewed as a member of multiple groups and the impact of this on his/her interpersonal relationships in any one group will be studied. Special attention will be given to demonstrating the application of group dynamics to problems of families, communities and organizations.

 CURRICULUM SEQUENCE 2010 - 2013

CURRICULUM SEQUENCE 2006 - 2009