B.S. in Psychology

REQUIRED COURSES IN THE MAJOR OF PSYCHOLOGY

  • PSYC 101 General Psychology 3
  • PSYC 102 Developmental Psychology 3
  • PSYC 108 Scientific Method in Psychology 3
  • PSYC 213 Theories of Personality 3
  • PSYC 219 History and Systems of Psychology 3
  • PSYC 231 Social Psychology 3
  • PSYC 300 Psychology of Learning 3
  • PSYC 316 Psychological Statistics I 3
  • PSYC 317 Psychological Statistics II 3
  • PSYC 320 Experimental Psychology 3
  • PSYC 322 Psychology of Perception 3
  • PSYC 399 Junior Seminar 3
  • PSYC 497 Senior Seminar 3
  • PSYC ELEC Psychology Elective  3
  • PSYC ELEC  Psychology Elective 3
  • BIOL 102 Introductory Biology II 4

CHOSE 6 CREDITS

  • Foreign Language (Two sequential courses in the same language) 3
  • Foreign Language (Two sequential courses in the same language) 3

  or

  • COSC 110 Introduction to Computing 3
  • INSS 141 Introduction to Computer-Based Information Systems 3

 


Psychology Course Offerings

PSYC 101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY - Three hours; 3 credits. This course covers several areas of psychology including learning, motivation, emotion, developmental changes, personality, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy, and social behavior with special attention to the physiological and neurological bases of human behavior.

PSYC 102 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGYThree hours; 3 credits. This course introduces the student to the major topics associated with the growth, development and maturation of the normal individual across the life-span. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC 103 PREVENTION SCIENCE THEORY AND PRACTICE SEMINAR IThree hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits.  This course provides theory-driven knowledge for understanding how this emerging science is translated into well-developed preventive interventions.  Conducted in seminar format, it integrates participants' field experience with the science to facilitate students' understanding of major prevention science theory, principles, research methodology, and community base-building in public mental health.

PSYC 108 SCIENTIFIC METHOD IN PSYCHOLOGY - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits. This course is designed to provide a basis for understanding the significance and nature of experimentation and to introduce the principles underlying experimental design. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. 

PSYC 203 PREVENTION SCIENCE THEORY AND PRACTICE SEMINAR I - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits.  This course provides theory-driven knowledge for understanding how this emerging science is translated into well-developed preventive interventions.  Conducted in seminar format, it integrates participants' field experience with the science to facilitate students' understanding of major prevention science theory, principles, research methodology, and community base-building in public mental health. 

PSYC 204 HONORS SEMINAR AND COLLOQUIUM I - One hour; 1 credit.  The weekly Honors Seminar consists of two major components:  the Colloquium Lecture Series and Supportive Activities.  During the Colloquium Lecture Series, distinguished research scholars explore different mental health related research issues. Specifically, students are given the opportunity to glean from the expertise of these scholars in the field. Students are also engaged in hands-on supportive activities that consist of graduate school preparation, autobiographical sketches, personal statements, internship advisement, publication/grant writing, and web page design.

PSYC 205 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT - Three hours; 3 credits. This course investigates the nature of adjustment and maladjustment with emphasis on methods and techniques by which the individual's mental health might be preserved. Preventive rather than curative measures will be stressed.

PSYC 206 HONORS SEMINAR COLLOQUIUM II - One hour; 1 credit.  The weekly Honors Seminar is designed to facilitate professional development in students pursuing a mental health related career.  Over the course, students are engaged in a series of stimulating dialogues with scholars in the field.  Guest speakers are invited to share their knowledge on various problem areas in mental health research, which explores theoretical, methodological and practical implications.  Students also focus on presenting their research project at major conferences.

PSYC 209 APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY - Three hours; 3 credits. This course covers the application of psychological principles to personnel administration and selection, morale and incentives, reflective thinking, military life, housing and vocational choice and adjustment.

PSYC 210 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY - Three hours; 3 credits. The comparison of normal and abnormal behavior, the study of the methods by which abnormal behavior may be analyzed and a survey of classical examples displaying selected traits of poor or inadequate adjustment are the principal features of this course.

PSYC 213 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY - Three hours; 3 credits. This course involves consideration of the principles by which behavior and personality are studied and diagnosed by the psychologist as well as the major theories of personality. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC 219 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY - Three hours; 3 credits. The development of modern psychologies, from Hellenic pre-science through contemporary cognitive processes, is the focus of this course.

PSYC 231 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY - Three hours; 3 credits. This course examines social variables as interacting with psychological variables to give dimension and direction to human behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC 268 THE PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING - Three hours; 3 credits. A multi-disciplinary study of the processes and problems of aging, this course emphasizes the importance of research in the solution of practical problems.

PSYC 300 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits. The main concerns of this course are the examination of learned behavior as viewed through experimentation and the exploration of the several learning theories. 

PSYC 301 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits. This course covers basic neuroanatomy, followed by consideration of the physiological basis of motivation, emotion, learning and other behavioral phenomena.

PSYC 302 TOPICS IN MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH - Three hours; 3 credits.  This course is designed to introduce students to various mental health-related topics, issues and careers.  Students will be given the opportunity to research issues surrounding mental health, including conceptualizations of and approaches to studying mental health.  Students' research skills will be sharpened through conducting library searches, critiquing literature, writing literature reviews, and making mock research presentations to fellow students and research faculty, in preparation for conducting their own independent research projects.

PSYC 303 PREVENTION SCIENCE THEORY AND PRACTICE SEMINAR I - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits.  This course provides theory-driven knowledge for understanding how this emerging science is translated into well-developed preventive interventions.  Conducted in seminar format, it integrates participants' field experience with the science to facilitate students' understanding of major prevention science theory, principles, research methodology, and community base-building in public mental health.

PSYC 304 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY FOR MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHOLOGY - Two hours; 2 credits.  This course provides students with a well-grounded foundation in conducting mental health research.  It is designed to present a balanced approach, covering various theoretical, psychological and methodological issues.  Students will learn about and ascertain ethical issues in scientific investigations, basic statistical analysis, literature reviews, laboratory experiments, scientific report writing and verbal presentation.

PSYC 306 PSYCHOLOGY OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN - Three hours; 3 credits. Considered in this course is a wide range of psychological, educational, physical, physiological and sociological deficiencies, which help to describe and explain the concept of the exceptional child. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC 307 COMPUTER USE IN SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATION - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits.  This course trains students as future graduate students.  Therefore, students should expect to be challenged and pushed at a more rigorous level.  A major aspect of this process involves understanding computer applications for scientific investigations.  This course offers basic competencies and skills needed to organize and analyze behavioral research data.  Students will be provided with hands-on experience in executing literature searches, navigating the worldwide web and manipulating data sets, using the spreadsheet program EXCEL and SPSS statistical data analysis software.

PSYC 308 HONORS SEMINAR AND COLLOQUIUM III - One hour; 1 credit.   The weekly Honors Seminar consists of two major components:  the Colloquium Lecture Series and Supportive Activities.  During the Colloquium Lecture Series, distinguished research scholars explore different mental health related research issues. Specifically, students are given the opportunity to glean from the expertise of these scholars in the field. Students are also engaged in hands-on supportive activities that consist of graduate school preparation, autobiographical sketches, personal statements, internship advisement, publication/grant writing, and web page design.

PSYC 309 TOPICS IN MINORITY MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH AND INTERVENTION - Three hours; 3 credits.  This course introduces students to a holistic approach to mental health, explores public policy implications and mental health research career opportunities, and fully explores minority issues in mental health conceptualization, prevention and treatment.

PSYC 310 HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY - Three hours; 3 credits.  This course explores the application of psychological principles to the understanding, prevention and treatment of a variety of health problems, including hypertension, stress-related conditions, substance abuse and other addictive behaviors, such as HIV/AIDS, etc.

PSYC 311 PSYCHOLOGY OF INTERVIEWING - Three hours; 3 credits. This course is designed to introduce the student to the psychological dynamics of interviewing techniques

PSYC 312 AN INTRODUCTION TO BEHAVIORAL PHARMACOLOGY - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits.  This course is designed to provide a foundation in the unique principles of behavioral pharmacology.  In addition to an introduction to the principles of learning and of pharmacology, students will study the physiological basis of such phenomena as the drug euphoria, disphoria, drug relapse, reinforcement properties of abused substances (street drugs), acute and chronic effects of drug use as well as drug dependence, tolerance and sensitization.  Students will be challenged to discuss current research literature in this field.

PSYC 315 PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits. This course involves the study of test materials and types, the nature and adequacy of standardization of selected tests and some experience in the administration and interpretation of test data.

PSYC 316 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS I - Two hours lecture, two hours lab; 3 credits. This course includes laboratory activity and covers the statistical measures from graphic representation through normal probability hypothesis testing.  Prerequisite: a "C" or higher in PSYC 108.

PSYC 317 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS II - Two hours lecture, two hour lab; 3 credits. This course assumes satisfactory achievement in PSYC 316 or its equivalent. It treats statistical analysis from the standpoint of the requirements of the nature of the research problems with a focus on inferential issues. Methods of multivariate analysis, multiple regression and nonparametric statistics are covered.  Prerequisite: a "C" or higher in PSYC 108 and PSYC 316.

PSYC 318 INTRODUCTORY CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY - Three hours; 3 credits. This course involves (1)studying the nature of the work of the clinical psychologist as distinguished from that of the psychiatrist and psychiatric social worker; and (2) laboratory experience in the typical methods and techniques of the clinical psychologist when diagnosing and treating problem behavior in children, adolescents and adults. Prerequisites: PSYC 210 and PSYC 213.

PSYC 319 PSYCHOLOGICAL COUNSELIN - Three hours; 3  credits. The primary objective of this course is to acquaint the student with the major theories and techniques of psychological counseling.

PSYC 320 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY I - Two hours lecture, two hours lab; 3 credits. This course is intended to provide several opportunities to study and apply the theory of psychological experimentation and laboratory instrumentation to an understanding of selected phenomena. Prerequisites: a "C" or higher in PSYC 108 and PSYC 316.

PSYC 321 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY II: PSYCHOPHYSICSTwo hours lecture, two hours lab; 3 credits. This course considers the logic of measurement and modern psychophysical scaling techniques; it focuses on small, individual research problems in the laboratory setting. Prerequisite: PSYC 320.

PSYC 322 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERCEPTION - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits. The nature of perception and perceptual process and their roles in the behavior of both humans and infrahumans are the principal concern of this course.

PSYC 325-326 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION I and II - Six hours; 6 credits. These courses are to provide for credits earned under the Cooperative Education Program that have been approved by the university and for students who pursue research courses at other institutions as part of their experimental program.

PSYC 368 DEATH AND DYING - Three hours; 3 credits. This course examines the area of death and dying as influenced by cultural, psychological and individual factors in society. Special emphasis will be placed on death attitudes and the relationship to various lifestyles.

PSYC 398 CONFERENCE COURSE - One to Three hours; 1-3 credits. This course is designed to permit the student a scheduled time for extensive reading in selected topics. Specific activities will involve (a) reading as directed, and (b) conferring with the instructor on the readings completed. Several book reviews and/or abstracts of journal articles may be required. Each conference will constitute an examination of the conferee's experiences. Admission by permission of the Departmental Chairperson.

PSYC 399 JUNIOR SEMINAR - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits. This course integrates the research skills the student has acquired as a Psychology major. Students engage in individual research similar to that found in graduate thesis courses. Each student proposes an original research project. Prerequisite: a "C" or higher in PSYC 320.

PSYC 402 SENIOR MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH SEMINAR I - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits.  This course integrates the research skills students have acquired in MMHRSP.  Students will be required to design an original mental health-related research project and write the introduction, literature review, and method section of a research report.

PSYC 403 PREVENTION SCIENCE THEORY AND PRACTICE SEMINAR I - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 2 credits.  This course provides theory-driven knowledge for understanding how this emerging science is translated into well-developed preventive interventions.  Conducted in seminar format, it integrates participants' field experience with the science to facilitate students' understanding of major prevention science theory, principles, research methodology, and community base-building in public mental health.

PSYC 404 SENIOR MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH SEMINAR II - Three hours lecture, one hour lab; 3 credits.  This course completes the research project begun in Senior Research Seminar I.  Students are to collect and analyze data and write the results and discussion sections of reports on their original research projects.  Students will be required to write a thesis and a publication version of the investigation, and to submit the latter version to an undergraduate research publication.  In addition, students must present the results of their investigation at a scientific conference.

PSYC 405 BLACK PSYCHOLOGY - Three hours; 3 credits. This course is designed to examine the scientific literature evaluating ethnic behavior in general and of African-American behavior in particular.

PSYC 408 HONORS SEMINAR AND COLLOQUIUM IV - One hour; 1 credit.  The weekly Honors Seminar is designed to facilitate professional development in students pursuing a mental health related career.  Over the course, students are engaged in a series of stimulating dialogues with scholars in the field.  Guest speakers are invited to share their knowledge on various problem areas in mental health research, which explores theoretical, methodological and practical implications.  Students also focus on presenting their research project at major conferences.

PSYC 412 BEHAVIORAL PHARMACOLOGY II - Three hours lecture, three hours lab; 4 credits.  This course is designed to integrate students' knowledge of research methods (PSYC 108), principles of learning (PSYC 200), and that attained in the introduction to behavioral pharmacology (PSYC 312) by conducting experiments in the Behavioral Pharmacology Laboratory.  Students will learn to conduct experiments using an operant conditioning paradigm and an animal model to study the subjective effects of abused substances (street drugs).  They will generate data to determine such measures as learning and dose-effects curves and time-effect analyses.  Prerequisites: PSYC 108, 202, and 312 and MATH 111 or higher.

PSYC 480-481 PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP - Nine hours per week each; 3 credits each. This course involves placement in a community service agency to familiarize the student with its current practices. Supervised client contact will be provided. Students must have completed 23 hours of psychology courses and a GPA of at least 2.8 in Psychology. Issues in clinical, applied, and community psychology will be explored under the supervision of the internship coordinator.

PSYC 497 SENIOR SEMINAR - Three hours; 3 credits. This course completes the research experience begun in PSYC 399. The student collects data, analyzes results and writes a full research report. Student research papers are formally presented and defended at student research conferences. Prerequisite: PSYC 399.

PSYC 498 SENIOR INTERNSHIP - Nine hours per week; 3 credits. This course provides the opportunity for the student to obtain supervised work experience in the major at an off-campus site selected and approved by the Departmental Chairperson. Registration is limited to seniors with minimum 3.0 cumulative and major averages and requires approval of the Departmental Chairperson. The Dean may approve exceptions.